Czech Philharmonic • Giovanni Antonini


Two orchestras will take turns on stage during this programme: the Czech Student Philharmonic and the Czech Philharmonic. The junior ensemble will begin with a Mozart symphony and will experience working with the outstanding conductor Giovanni Antonini, who will also be the soloist in a concerto by Telemann.

  • Subscription series A
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  • Duration of the programme 1 hour 40 minutes

Programme

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K 550 (35')

— Intermission —

Georg Philipp Telemann
Concerto in C major pro for recorder, strings, and harpsichord, TWV 51:C1 (16')

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Symphony No. 41 C major, K 551, “Jupiter” (31')

Performers

Stefano Barneschi violin, concertmaster

Giovanni Antonini conductor, recorder

Czech Student Philharmonic

Czech Philharmonic

Photo illustrating the event Czech Philharmonic Giovanni Antonini

Rudolfinum — Dvořák Hall

Dress rehearsal


Price from 290 to 1400 CZK Tickets and contact information

Customer Service of Czech Philharmonic

Tel.:  +420 227 059 227

E-mail: info@czechphilharmonic.cz

Customer service is available on weekdays from 9.00 am to 6.00 pm.

 

“To me, Prague is a magical place, and I take every visit there to give a concert as a special opportunity. I am doubly looking forward to this visit because I will be conducting not only the great Czech Philharmonic, but also the Czech Student Philharmonic. As an orchestra with a long tradition, the Czech Philharmonic is now opening up to new ways of interpreting the classical repertoire. And young musicians are the future of classical music. Their energy and desire to learn are the engine that drives music, and they set an example for other young people that they draw to concert halls”, wrote Maestro Antonini.

Performers

Stefano Barneschi  violin
Giovanni Antonini  conductor
The Czech Youth Philharmonic  

In the modern history of the Czech Philharmonic, when the first steps were being taken towards an educational programme, the idea arose in 2006 – while Václav Riedlbauch was still the executive director – of giving symphonic concerts for student audiences, i.e. for a new generation of listeners. And who would be playing? The Czech Philharmonic, of course! The problem was that the orchestra was already so busy that their participation in such concerts was out of the question. So the choice fell to the former Prague Youth Orchestra, an ensemble with many years of tradition of a youthful, enthusiastic approach to music. This worked wonderfully, because the students in the audience saw their peers on stage. For these concerts, the ensemble took the name Czech Youth Orchestra. Bound by their love of music, these musicians gave performances from 2006 to 2010 under the leadership of the conductor Marko Ivanović, playing such works as Janáček’s Sinfonietta, Dvořák’s New World Symphony, Cello Concerto, and Te Deum, Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition, and Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet ballet suite.

When new management took over in 2011, the Czech Philharmonic greatly expanded its educational activities, and that was an opportunity for renewal of the student orchestra’s activities, renamed as the Czech Youth Philharmonic. The idea is to give the rising generation of musicians – mostly students at music schools, whether grammar schools with a music emphasis, conservatoires, or academies of music – the regular opportunity of rehearsing and performing great symphonic, concertante, and choral works. Over time, the efforts turned towards creating a permanent orchestra that would support its members in the perfecting of their ensemble playing and in the creation of long-term relationships and mutual understanding. The Czech Youth Philharmonic musicians also serve as “bearers of light” in relation to their peers by showing them that young people can love classical music and can present it enthusiastically to others.

Since the 2013/2014 season, the orchestra has been performing regularly at concerts of the Czech Philharmonic’s educational series Four Steps to the New World (under the baton of Marko Ivanović), and at the series Penguins at the Rudolfinum (with Vojtěch Jouza) and Who’s Afraid of the Philharmonic? (with Ondřej Vrabec). In April 2019, the Czech Youth Philharmonic appeared with Ida Kelarová and the Čhavorenge children’s choir at Šun Devloro concerts – musical celebrations of International Romani Day. In November 2019, the orchestra played under the baton of Robert Kružík at the Students’ Day Concert with the participation of Joachim Gauck and Petr Pithart.

In June 2020 the conductor Simon Rattle came to Prague insisting that he did not want to conduct just the Czech Philharmonic, but also “some orchestra with young people”. When the choice fell to the Czech Youth Philharmonic, that was an enormous challenge for its members. Sir Simon enjoyed working with the young musicians, and he was unsparing in his praise: “The Czech Youth Philharmonic reminds me of the orchestra of the Verbier Festival, which is made up of the best music students from all around the world, led by players from the Metropolitan Opera. That’s the level they are on.” Those are nice, flattering words, but they also mean an enormous obligation for all of the young musicians, as far as their future is concerned. Each individually and all of them together have it within their reach through the power of their common bond to remain diligent and conscientious in their preparation and to concentrate as attentively as possible. In the autumn of 2020 they were able to play just two concerts with Josef Špaček in the dual role of soloist and conductor. “I would really like to work with them again sometime; they were so attentive and kind! I had an incredibly good time with them,” said Josef Špaček afterwards.

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