Photo illustrating page  Stabat Mater Steps to the New World with Antonín Dvořák

Steps to the New World with Antonín Dvořák • Stabat Mater


Czech Philharmonic

In the course of two years, Antonín Dvořák and his wife lost all three of their children. The composer's Stabat Mater bears witness of how the Dvořáks dealt with the loss.

Subscription series K
Duration of the programme 2 hod
From 11 years

Programme

Antonín Dvořák
Stabat Mater (selections)

Performers

Czech Student Philharmonic
Marko Ivanović conductor

Petr Kadlec guide

Veronika Rovná soprano
Markéta Cukrová alto
Richard Samek tenor
František Zahradníček bass

Czech Academic Choir
Michal Vajda choirmaster

Photo illustrating the event Steps to the New World with Antonín Dvořák Stabat Mater

Rudolfinum — Dvořák Hall

24 Mar 2022  Thursday 7.30pm
Available seats
Price from 230 to 550 Kč

Customer Service of Czech Philharmonic

Tel.:  +420 227 059 227

E-mail: info@czechphilharmonic.cz

Customer Service office hours are on weekdays from 09:00 a.m. to 06:00 p.m.

Customer Service of Czech Philharmonic

Tel.:  +420 227 059 227

E-mail: info@czechphilharmonic.cz

Customer Service office hours are on weekdays from 09:00 a.m. to 06:00 p.m.

The program is based on a musical part but also on a spoken word that will be given in Czech language only. The program will not be supplied with English subtitles.

In the course of two years, Antonín Dvořák and his wife lost all three of their children. By tragic coincidence, three-year-old Otakar died precisely on Dvořák’s 36th birthday – 8 September 1877. We have no more detailed account of how Dvořák and his wife dealt with the sudden loss of the children they loved. His Stabat Mater (1876–77) bears witness of a certain kind. Traditionally performed during the Easter season, it surprisingly received its Prague première during Advent on 23 December 1880.

According to Richard Novák, a lifelong performer and devotee of Dvořák’s music: “Stabat Mater is about enormous sorrow. Ultimately, that sorrow is not drastic or dramatic, but cathartic. Stabat Mater is about the compassion experienced by a mother when losing a son who is suffering terribly. There could hardly be a greater sorrow. It carves its way deeply into your soul. I truly love the opening of the composition, which is very lengthy – 20 minutes. That’s amazingly courageous! How the sorrow slowly grows until it reaches the heart… and Dvořák keeps us in a state of great trepidation. I think the right interpretative approach is to maintain that quiet sorrow, to give it space, and let it be heard to the fullest. It has to be experienced. From the music, one must get a sense of prayer and piety.”

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