Photo illustrating page  Yuja Wang Czech Philharmonic

Czech Philharmonic • Yuja Wang


Czech Philharmonic

The centrepiece of this exciting evening is the Glagolitic Mass, a late masterpiece by Leoš Janáček. The programme opens with Agnus Dei for choir without orchestral accompaniment by Martin Smolka. It is balanced by an instrumental work from the same period as the Glagolitic Mass: Stravinsky’s Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments.

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Programme

Martin Smolka
Agnus Dei, for two choirs a cappella

Igor Stravinsky
Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments

Leoš Janáček
Glagolitic Mass, a cantata for soloists, choir, orchestra and organ

Performers

Yuja Wang piano
Evelina Dobračeva soprano
Lucie Hilscherová alto
Aleš Briscein tenor
Jan Martiník bass
Daniela Valtová Kosinová organ

Prague Philharmonic Choir
Lukáš Vasilek choirmaster

Semyon Bychkov conductor

Czech Philharmonic

Photo illustrating the event Czech Philharmonic Yuja Wang

Rudolfinum — Dvořák Hall

23 Feb 2022  Wednesday 7.30pm
Available seats
24 Feb 2022  Thursday 7.30pm
Available seats
25 Feb 2022  Friday 7.30pm
Available seats
Price from 290 to 1400 Kč

Customer Service of Czech Philharmonic

Tel.:  +420 227 059 227

E-mail: info@czechphilharmonic.cz

Customer Service office hours are on weekdays from 09:00 a.m. to 06:00 p.m. July, August from 09:00 a.m. to 03:00 p.m.

Customer Service of Czech Philharmonic

Tel.:  +420 227 059 227

E-mail: info@czechphilharmonic.cz

Customer Service office hours are on weekdays from 09:00 a.m. to 06:00 p.m. July, August from 09:00 a.m. to 03:00 p.m.

Performers

Yuja Wang  piano
Yuja Wang

Her singular blend of technical prowess, keen musical insight, and emotional depth have established Yuja Wang as one of the world’s finest performers.

Yuja’s 2017/2018 season features recitals, concert series, and extensive tours with some of the world’s most venerated ensembles and conductors. She began the summer of 2017 on tour with the London Symphony Orchestra and Michael Tilson Thomas and a program featuring Brahms’s Piano Concerto No. 2, followed by a performance of the first concerto at the Ravinia Festival with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, under the baton of Lionel Bringuier. Later engagements include concerts with the Munich Philharmonic and Valery Gergiev, a series of performances at the Verbier Festival, and a three-city German tour with the St. Petersburg Philharmonic.

She also embarks on play-conduct tours with two of the best chamber orchestras in the world, Mahler Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Orchestra of Europe, as well as joining the inaugural tour of Jaap van Zweden with the New York Philharmonic and the final tour of Yannick Nézet-Séguin’s directorship with the Rotterdam Philharmonic. Other notable appearances include concerts in Hong Kong, Miami, Washington D.C., Prague, Tel Aviv, and Berlin.

Winter of 2017 sees Yuja reunite with violinist and frequent collaborator Leonidas Kavakos for a European chamber tour, whilst in the spring of 2018, Ms. Wang will embark on a vast-reaching recital tour at premiere venues in the US and Europe; New York City, San Francisco, Rome, Vienna, Berlin, Paris, and beyond.

Yuja Wang was born in Beijing. She began piano lessons at the age of six, and her progress was accelerated by studies at Beijing’s Central Conservatory of Music. In 1999 she moved to Canada to participate in the Morningside Music summer program at Calgary’s Mount Royal College, and thereafter enrolled as the youngest ever student at Mount Royal Conservatory. Wang’s exceptional gifts were widely recognised in 2001 with her appointment as a Steinway Artist, and again the following year when she was offered a place at Philadelphia’s prestigious Curtis Institute of Music, where she studied with Gary Graffman.

By the time Yuja graduated from Curtis in 2008, she had already gained momentum following the spectacular success of her debut three years earlier with the National Arts Center Orchestra in Ottawa. Wang attracted widespread international attention in March 2007 when she replaced Martha Argerich on short notice in performances of Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1 with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and within the span of just a few seasons she was working with conductors of the highest calibre. Over the past decade of her career, she has worked with such pre-eminent Maestros as Claudio Abbado, Daniel Barenboim, Gustavo Dudamel, Valery Gergiev, Michael Tilson Thomas, Antonio Pappano, Charles Dutoit, and Zubin Mehta.

In January 2009, Yuja Wang became an exclusive Deutsche Grammophon recording artist. Her debut album, Sonatas & Etudes, prompted Gramophone to name her as its 2009 Young Artist of the Year. Her 2011 release of Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto No. 2 and Paganini’s Rhapsody with the Mahler Chamber Orchestra and Claudio Abbado was nominated for a Grammy® Award in the Best Classical Instrumental Solo category.

Lucie Hilscherová  alto
Aleš Briscein  tenor
Aleš Briscein

Among plans of Czech tenor Ales Briscein are new productions of Eugene Onegin at the Komische Oper Berlin and of Janacek’s From the House of the Dead at Savonlinna Opera Festival, as well as concert performances of Jenufa underJiri Belohlavek with Czech Philharmonic in London and of Vec Makropulos alsounder Jiri Belohlavek at the BBC Proms. He will be on tour in Japan with State Opera Prague as Pollione in Bellini’s Norma, and in Hong Kong with National Theatre of Brrno as Alber Gregor in Vek Makropulos and with the Glagolitic Mass.

In 2017 he will give his role debut in the title role of Zemlinsky’s Der Zwerg in Graz and sing a new production Lohengrin at Prague National Theatre conducted by John Fiore.

In spring 2018 he will return to Munich State Opera for a new production From the House of the Dead, where he will perform the part of Filka Morozov.

Besides this he is guesting at many theatres and festivals of his home country in roles like Jiri in Dvorak‘s Jakobin, Ladislav in Smetana‘s Two widows, Prince in Rusalka, Conte di Albafloria in Martinu‘s Mirandolina, as Jaromér in Fibich’s Pád Arkuna, as Lukas in Smetana’s The Kiss, as Alfredo in La Traviata, in the title role of Lohengrin or 2015 as Pollione in Bellini’s Norma.

in 2015 he debuted in the part of Königssohn in Humperdinck’s Königskinder at Opera Frankfurt, performed Laca in Janacek’s Jenufa at the Teatro Comunale di Bologna and sang Stravinskiy’s Les Noces in Rome. 2013/14 he guested in new productions of Così fan tutte at the Komische Oper and of Jenufa in Graz. 2013 he was heard as Andrej in Tchaikowsky’s Mazeppa at the Komische Oper Berlin and as Steva in Jenufa at the Bavarian State Opera in Munich.

In summer 2012 he had a huge success in the title role of Wagner’s Lohengrin at the Tyrolean Festival in Erl under Gustav Kuhn and sang Smetana’s seldom performed opera Two Widows in Angers and Nantes.

In summer 2011 he debuted at Salzburg Festival in a new production Vec Makropulos conducted by Esa-Pekka Salonen and staged by Christoph Marthaler.

He also was heard in Nürnberg, Vancouver, Tokyo, Cyprus, Lille, Caen, Antwerp, Valencia, Vienna, London and Frankfurt. 

Ales Briscein started his career as Tamino in Die Zauberflöte in Prague, where in the meantime he has sung many roles and where he is performing regularly.

For many years he regularly guested at Opéra de Bastille in Paris, where he was heard as, among others, Brighella in Ariadne auf Naxos, Kedril in From the House of the dead, Ein junger Diener in Elektra, Hirt/Junger Seemann in Tristan und Isolde, Valzacchi in Der Rosenkavalier, Janek in Vec Makropulos, Jeník in The bartered bride, Jaquino in Fidelio and as Kudriash in Kát‘a Kabanova.

Ales Briscein works with conductors such as Christoph von Dohnanyi, Sir Charles Mackeras, Valeri Gergiev, Jiri Belohlavek, John Fiore, Sylvain Cambreling, Kent Nagano, Tomas Netopil, Esa Pekka Salonen, or David Zinman

Jan Martiník  bass
Jan Martiník

JAN MARTINÍK
Bass

Young czech Bass Jan Martiník was born in 1983 in Ostrava where he studied on Janáček Conservatory and on the University of Ostrava with Eliška Pappová. 2003 he won the International Singing Competition Antonín Dvořák in Karlovy Vary in the category Junior and was also rewarded with the second prize in the category "Lied". Jan Martiník is laureate of the International Competition Jelena Obraztsova, where he won the special prize for the best Tchajkovsky romance. 2007 he was finalist in Placido Domingo´s Competition "Operalia" and in 2009 in Cardiff Singer of the World, where he won the category "Song".

While studying at the university he appeared in roles at the NDM Ostrava, including Pistola (Falstaff), Leporello (Don Giovanni) and Truffaldino (Ariadne auf Naxos). At the National Theatre Prague he sung roles including Masetto (Don Giovanni), Larkens and José Castro (La fanciulla del West), Leporello (Don Giovanni) in the new production in Estates theatre.

From 2008 to 2011 Jan Martiník was a member of Komische Oper Berlin, where he sung roles including Sarastro (Die Zauberflöte), Colline (La bohème), Surin (Pique Dame) and Nachtwächter (Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg). In Volksoper Vienna he sung Betto (Gianni Schicchi), 1.Nazarener (Salome) as well as Zuniga in Carmen. Since 2012/13 Jan Martiník is a member of Staatsoper Unter den Linden, Berlin, where he performes roles including Colline (La Bohéme), Sarastro (Die Zauberflöte), Eremit (Der Freischütz), as well as Father Trulove (The Rake´s Progress).

In concerts the young Bass was working with well known orchestras such as Czech Philharmonic, Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, Staatskapelle Dresden, BBC Symphony Orchestra, Brimingham Symphony Orchestra, the Scottish Chamber Orchestra, as well as the King´s Consort and the Collegium 1704. Amongst other pieces of the concert repertoire he has performed Jesus in St. Matthews Passion, as well as the Aria Part, the Bass Parts in Mozart, Dvořák and Verdiʼs Requiem, Dvořák Te Deum, Beethovens 9. Symphony and Haydns Schöpfung. Jan Martiník is already known for his sincere interpretations of Schubertʼs Winterreise and Dvořák Biblical Songs

The beauty of his voice matches with a splendid technique and a comical talent, which makes him one of the leading singers of the young generation.

Lukáš Vasilek  choirmaster
Lukáš Vasilek

Lukáš Vasilek, principal conductor of the Prague Philharmonic Choir, studied conducting at the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague, and musicology at the Faculty of Arts, Charles University in Prague. For eleven seasons from 1998 he was conductor of the Foerster Female Chamber Choir, and between 2005 and 2007 was also second choirmaster of the Prague National Theatreʼs opera chorus. He took up his post at the helm of the Prague Philharmonic Choir in 2007. Apart from preparing and conducting the choirʼs a cappella concert productions, he has been building up the Prague Philharmonic Choirʼs repertoire set for participation in large-scale cantata, oratorio and opera projects, working with leading international conductors (such as Barenboim, Bělohlávek, Eschenbach, Honeck, Hrůša, Jordan, Luisi, Mehta, Noseda and Rattle) and orchestras (including the Berliner Philharmoniker, Czech Philharmonic, Israel Philharmonic, St Petersburg Philharmonic, Staatskapelle Dresden or Wiener Symphoniker). Since 2010, the Prague Philharmonic Choir under Vasilekʼs direction has guest appeared regularly at the opera festival in Bregenz, Austria.

Lukáš Vasilek has made numerous recordings with the Prague Philharmonic Choir for various major labels, including Decca Classics, Deutsche Grammophon, Sony Classical and Supraphon. In 2016, the last mentioned of these issued an album of Bohuslav Martinů’s cantatas which was nominated for the BBC Music Magazine’s annual award in the choral category, among other plaudits.

Semyon Bychkov  conductor
Semyon Bychkov

Semyon Bychkov's tenure as Chief Conductor and Music Director of the Czech Philharmonic was initiated with concerts in Prague, London, New York and Washington marking the 100th anniversary of Czechoslovak independence in 2018. Since the culmination of The Tchaikovsky Project in 2019 – a 7-CD box set released by Decca Classics and a series of international residencies – Bychkov and the Czech Philharmonic have been focusing on the symphonic works of Mahler with performances and recordings scheduled both at home and abroad.

During the 2021/22 season, Mahler’s Fifth and Ninth Symphonies will be heard on tour at the Grafenegg Festival in Austria before performances in Prague. The Czech Philharmonic’s 126th season’s subscription concerts in October will open with Mahler’s Ninth Symphony. In the spring, a Czech Festival at Vienna’s Musikverein featuring Smetana’s vlast – recorded by Bychkov and the Czech Philharmonic during lockdown - alongside works by Kabeláč, Dvořák, Martinů and Janáček will be followed by an extensive European tour including concerts at the Philharmonie in Berlin, Hamburg’s Elbphilharmonie and two concerts at London’s Barbican Centre.  

Especially recognised for his interpretations of the core repertoire, Bychkov has also worked closely with many extraordinary contemporary composers including Luciano Berio, Henri Dutilleux and Maurizio Kagel. In recent seasons he has collaborated with René Staar, Thomas Larcher, Richard Dubignon, Detlev Glanert and Julian Anderson, conducting premières of their works with the Vienna Philharmonic, New York Philharmonic, Royal Concertgebouw and the BBC Symphony Orchestra at the BBC Proms. Highlights of the new season include the German première of Larcher’s Piano Concerto with dedicatee Kirill Gerstein in Berlin, the Czech première of Bryce Dessner’s Mari and the world première of Anderson’s Prague Panoramas, also presented in Prague. The three new works are amongst fourteen commissions initiated by Bychkov at the start of his tenure with the Czech Philharmonic.

In common with the Czech Philharmonic, Bychkov has one foot firmly in the culture of the East and the other in the West. Born in St Petersburg in 1952, Bychkov emigrated to the United States in 1975 and has lived in Europe since the mid-1980's. Singled out for an extraordinarily privileged musical education from the age of 5, Bychkov studied piano before winning his place at the Glinka Choir School where, aged 13, he received his first lesson in conducting. He was 17 when he was accepted at the Leningrad Conservatory to study with the legendary Ilya Musin and, within three years had won the influential Rachmaninov Conducting Competition. Denied the prize of conducting the Leningrad Philharmonic, Bychkov left the former Soviet Union.  

By the time Bychkov returned to St Petersburg in 1989 as the Philharmonic’s Principal Guest Conductor, he had enjoyed success in the US as Music Director of the Grand Rapids Symphony Orchestra and the Buffalo Philharmonic.  His international career, which began in France with Opéra de Lyon and at the Aix-en-Provence Festival, took off with a series of high-profile cancellations which resulted in invitations to conduct the New York Philharmonic, Berlin Philharmonic and Royal Concertgebouw Orchestras.  In 1989, he was named Music Director of the Orchestre de Paris; in 1997, Chief Conductor of the WDR Symphony Orchestra Cologne; and the following year, Chief Conductor of the Dresden Semperoper.

Bychkov’s symphonic and operatic repertoire is wide-ranging. He conducts in all the major houses including La Scala, Opéra national de Paris, Dresden Semperoper, Wiener Staatsoper, New York’s Metropolitan Opera, the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden and Teatro Real. Madrid. While Principal Guest Conductor of Maggio Musicale Fiorentino, his productions of Janáček’s Jenůfa, Schubert’s Fierrabras, Puccini’s La bohème, Shostakovich’s Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk and Mussorgsky’s Boris Godunov each won the prestigious Premio Abbiati. New productions in Vienna included Strauss’ Der Rosenkavalier and Daphne, Wagner’s Lohengrin and Parsifal, and Mussorgsky’s Khovanshchina; while in London, he made his debut with a new production of Strauss’ Elektra, and subsequently conducted new productions of Mozart’s Così fan tutte, Strauss’ Die Frau ohne Schatten and Wagner’s Tannhäuser. Recent productions include Wagner’s Parsifal at the Bayreuth Festival and Strauss’s Elektra at the Wiener Staatsoper.

On the concert platform, the combination of innate musicality and rigorous Russian pedagogy has ensured that Bychkov’s performances are highly anticipated. In the UK, in addition to regular performances with the London Symphony Orchestra, his honorary titles at the Royal Academy of Music and the BBC Symphony Orchestra - with whom he appears annually at the BBC Proms – reflect the warmth of the relationships. In Europe, he tours frequently with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra and Munich Philharmonic, as well as being a frequent guest of the Vienna and Berlin Philharmonics, the Leipzig Gewandhaus, the Orchestre National de France and the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia; in the US, he can be heard with the New York Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony, Los Angeles Symphony, Philadelphia and Cleveland Orchestras. This season, in addition to extensive concert commitments with the Czech Philharmonic, Bychkov's guest conducting engagements include further performances of Mahler’s symphonies with the Orchestre de Paris, Leipzig Gewandhaus, Oslo Philharmonic and LA Philharmonic, and Strauss’s Elektra at the Opéra national de Paris.  

Bychkov made extensive recordings for Philips with the Berlin Philharmonic, Bavarian Radio, Royal Concertgebouw, Philharmonia, London Philharmonic and Orchestre de Paris. Later, his 13-year collaboration (1997-2010) with WDR Symphony Orchestra Cologne produced a series of benchmark recordings that included works by Strauss (Elektra, Daphne, Ein Heldenleben, Metamorphosen, Alpensinfonie, Till Eulenspiegel), Mahler (Symphony No. 3, Das Lied von der Erde), Shostakovich (Symphony Nos. 4, 7, 8, 10, 11), Rachmaninov (The Bells, Symphonic Dances, Symphony No. 2), Verdi (Requiem), a complete cycle of Brahms Symphonies, and works by Detlev Glanert and York Höller. His recording of Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin was recommended by BBC’s Radio 3’s Building a Library (2020); Wagner’s Lohengrin was BBC Music Magazine’s Record of the Year (2010); and Schmidt’s Symphony No. 2 with the Vienna Philharmonic was BBC Music Magazine’s Record of the Month (2018).  

In 2015, Semyon Bychkov was named Conductor of the Year by the International Opera Awards.

Compositions

Leoš Janáček
Glagolská mše, kantáta pro sóla, smíšený sbor, orchestr a varhany

Glagolská mše Leoše Janáčka (1854–1928) má spletitou genezi a je i složitým edičním problémem. Ačkoliv skladatel začal skicovat patrně již v roce 1920, k intenzivní kompozici se dostal až v roce 1926. Partitura mše vyšla až po skladatelově smrti v roce 1929, přičemž tato verze „poslední ruky“ se v mnohém liší od verze, která zazněla na světové premiéře díla 5. prosince 1927. Dnes již přesně nedoložíme, kdy a proč jednotlivé změny Janáček učinil, ale z dochovaných materiálů je zřejmé, že to bylo především z vnitřního popudu, nikoliv kvůli neschopnosti tehdejších interpretů, jak se mylně traduje. Ať už byly pohnutky jakékoliv, důkladnou ediční prací se podařilo zrekonstruovat verzi díla předcházející těmto rozsáhlým změnám, tedy znění prvního provedení. Zásahy provedené krátce po premiéře se týkají především tří částí – Úvodu, Gospodi pomiluj a Věruju. V Úvodu Janáček zjednodušil složitou polymetrickou stavbu, v části Gospodi pomiluj nahradil původní pětidobý takt čtyřdobým a v části Věruju vyškrtl centrální část s akordickými tympány. To ale zdaleka nejsou všechny změny. Janáček totiž celé dílo po premiéře také doinstrumentoval. Verze „září 1927“ tedy přináší v úplnosti původní znění Glagolské mše, na rozdíl od dříve publikované tzv. originální verze, která vkládá do verze poslední ruky pouze některé efektní momenty z původní partitury. Ačkoliv Janáček po premiéře dílo zrevidoval a dovedl do dokonalého tvaru, premiérová verze v sobě skrývá jinou hodnotu: značnou spontaneitu, živelnost a syrový výraz.

Jan Špaček

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